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Sabrina’s privilege lets her get away with everything, turning her into your basic TV frivolous white girl.

by Negesti Kaudo Note: light spoilers of 'Chilling Adventures of Sabrina' ahead. Sabrina Spellman, the teenage witch, has always been quirky, blonde, and charming. Whether you were first introduced to her through reading the comics, watching the 90s sitcom, or (my favorite) the animated series in the early 2000s, she has always remained the same: a blonde teenager struggling to balance her two identities while enduring the trials of American teenage life. With Netflix’s new TV adaptation of Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa’s comic books Chilling Adventures of Sabrina, it’s possible that many of us expected to see the witty Sabrina we know and love, but instead we were met with a new, darker Sabrina, whose darkness was overshadowed by an archetype we’ve all seen before. Being half-witch, Sabrina has been donned a privilege (maybe to other witches a blight) of living separate lives. Her father married a human, which was “controversial” to the Church of Night, but a point Sabrina refers to throughout the show to explain her defiance of religion and devotion to her human friends. Herein lies the problem (for me): Sabrina’s privilege lets her get away with everything, turning her into your basic TV frivolous white girl. She is Rachel on Friends or Serena in Gossip Girl—characters you start out loving, but as time goes on you become sick of watching them have everything spoon-fed to them by the people around them. By the sixth episode, Sabrina had not only become the least interesting character on the show, but also the most infuriating. The entire plot revolves around Sabrina becoming a full witch on her sixteenth birthday (also Halloween and a blood moon) by signing her soul over to the devil in the Book of the Beast. In doing this, Sabrina would relinquish all her ties to the mortal world, including her boyfriend Harvey and friends Roz and Susie, and begin attending school at The Academy of Unseen Arts…like all the other young witches. But, of course, Sabrina doesn’t—wanting to have it all: free will, her relationships, and her powers. In “Chapter Two: Dark Baptism,” Sabrina expresses her animosity to another witch, Prudence Night, who she’s summoned (literally, with a summoning spell) solely for the purpose of working together to torment human boys bullying her friend Susie. Prudence—a black witch played by Tati Gabrielle and leader of a trio of witches known as The Weird Sisters—let’s Sabrina know that as a woman, she’ll never have it all. SABRINA: I WANT BOTH. I WANT FREEDOM AND POWER. [LAUGHTER BY ALL THREE WEIRD SISTERS] PRUDENCE: HE’LL NEVER GIVE YOU THAT. THE DARK LORD. THE THOUGHT OF YOU, ANY OF US, HAVING BOTH TERRIFIES HIM. SABRINA: WHY IS THAT? PRUDENCE: HE’S A MAN, ISN’T HE? While the trio—Prudence, Agatha and Dorcas—despise Sabrina’s duality, referring to her as “half-breed” and taunting her throughout the show, they know more about Sabrina and her family than she knows herself. Here, Prudence establishes herself in the role of a sage, constantly filling in the gaps in Sabrina’s knowledge of witch history and religion. It’s not rare for the media to show people of color mentoring or guiding white people through complicated situations. For instance, Maggie Pierce and Dr. Miranda Bailey on Grey’s Anatomy; Queenie and Marie LaVeau in American Horror Story: Coven; and even in Gossip Girl, Blair Waldorf’s minions are mainly women of color who are more intelligent and equally wealthythese women’s character development is largely based on how they support their leading white women. Prudence and her crony Agatha (an Asian woman) follow narratives that focus on their interactions with Sabrina: how they “show” her witches should behave and how Sabrina maintains her “good witch” status in comparison to The Weird Sisters. Personally, I love Prudence. Not only because I really appreciate marginalized representation in Sci-Fi/ Fantasy television, but because she exudes confidence and elegance. She runs her clique meticulously. Her hair and makeup are fierce. And her loyalty to The Church of Night and The Dark Lord is even fiercer. I feel very strongly that Prudence is a Leo (unless all witches are Scorpios, which nullifies that theory). But still, Prudence is labeled the bad witch and a bitch because she is juxtaposed against the blonde silhouette of an ignorant and privileged Sabrina. The only people who dare to check Sabrina’s privilege throughout the show happen to all be people of color, mostly Prudence and Sabrina’s house-bound cousin, Ambrose (two of the three black witches on the show). It is Prudence who laughs at Sabrina’s questions of whether witches can perform exorcisms, which they can’t, but Sabrina does it anyways, once again to save her human friends while putting her family and coven in danger. It is Ambrose who tells Sabrina that she is selfish when she plots a way to resurrect Harvey’s brother by killing Agatha. Prudence questions Sabrina’s belief in The Church of Night.
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What’s taken me by surprise has been the deafening silence from spiritual leaders, witches, and healers in the wake of current events.

Over the last year, I’ve seen white supremacists take over the White House, normalize Nazi beliefs and violence, devalue American citizens in struggling U.S. territories and more. Though these events seem to have happened in breathtaking succession, I can’t say I was outright surprised by any of them. As a Black woman, I was never in a position to deny or hide from America’s shadow. It’s one I learned to recognize as a child, and it was only through intense study of its depths and origins that I was able to remove myself from its darkness. What’s taken me by surprise has been the deafening silence from spiritual leaders, witches, and healers in the wake of these events. It seems that, for as much as they encourage “confronting your shadow,” or becoming familiar with the less seemly parts of your personality, they are unwilling to recognize the societal shadow that casts us in oppressive systems and beliefs. At first it was puzzling to see their weekly newsletters appear in my inbox, without so much as a mention of incidents like Charlottesville. At most, they would acknowledge a “heavy energy” and advise us to protect our own, as though white supremacy could be conquered through visualization alone. At the bottom of these emails they urged followers to book a healing or coaching session, but how could I be counseled by someone who does not witness my struggle?
Related: RESPECTING LIVING PRACTICES THIS HALLOWEEN

Witches and workers of color deal with the realities of existing in today’s world and speak from a place that uses healing practices as a way to combat oppression while reclaiming heritage.

By Donyae Coles The world of online witchcraft and paganism can be very white-centric. Thankfully, online spaces have increased the visibility of practitioners and healers of color who are coming out from the shadows to embrace their magickal heritage on their own terms. For POC practitioners, the focus tends to be on healing and processing energy to increase protection and self-care. Witches and workers of color deal with the realities of existing in today’s world and speak from a place that uses healing practices as a way to combat oppression while reclaiming heritage. Here are eight healers of color you can follow online:  1. Brianna Suslovic: Brianna is a writer who is focused on racial and reproductive justice and LGBTQIA+ rights. Her work is often very topical and deals with what is happening the world today while also examining the practices of the past and how we can heal those injuries. For people who are new to the path, she is a good, slow introduction into the reality that this work is not all moonbeams and flower cuttings. She keeps her own blog here and Medium page. 2. Madame Omi Kongo: Madame Omi is a rootworker, she uses hoodoo practices to heal and help those who call on her. She comes from a long line of women who were in touch with their spiritual gifts and is carrying on the tradition. She uses and speaks on a brand of magickal traditions that have influenced her practice. Her Tumblr is full of bits of poetry and information for those who are interested in learning more about hoodoo and Black spirituality. She also has a personal site here and a Facebook here.
Related: I RECONNECTED TO MY BLACKNESS THROUGH HOODOO
3. This Black Witch: The Black Witch deals with social issues and calls out mainstream paganism for its white bias. This blog addresses culture with craft which is very important for people who are just getting started on their journey. Reading the work here can help people see that issues with racism and sexism are valid and real. She also conducts question and answer sessions. You can follow Black Witch on their blog, Facebook, and Twitter. 4. Traci Medeiros-Bagan: Traci is a therapist and educator who incorporates spiritual practices into her work. She is a QPOC and works with the LGBTQIA+ community to help them find healing and support. She writes about using tarot as a tool for self-care. You can read her blog here and she’ll be writing for the Little Red Tarot later this summer. 5. The Hoodwitch: Bri Luna is one of the first names to pop up when you’re looking for healers and magick folx of color online. She works as a tarot reader, astrologer, and sells supplies for cleansing and other spells through her online shop. She is also very vocally encourages POC to claim their roots and display their practices with pride. You can follow here at her blog here, on Facebook, or on Instagram.
Related: QUEER ACTIVISTS ARE USING MAGIC AS RESISTANCE

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