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Dubbing the sudden absence of predatory men as the categorical dimming of some bright, new era rings of a false equivalency for many marginalized viewers. 

If you have remained plugged into our daily Hollywood news cycle, it might seem as if each day brings a newly exposed sexual predator. While that may sound like hyperbole, the sentiment is actually not that inaccurate: since news of Harvey Weinstein's history of assault broke via major press in early October, dozens of celebrity abusers have been publicly identified by their victims. As an audience, our responses to the steady stream of stories have run the gamut – especially for those of us who have our own experiences with sexual abuse. Though some remain focused on the specific trauma (and to be clear, the well-being of the victims ought to be our collective priority), others have their sights set on the potential aftermath. What does all of this mean for Hollywood and the state of entertainment, in general? As we witness the rightful takedown of critically acclaimed men like Kevin Spacey and Louis C.K., many have wondered how this continued exposure of Hollywood's predatory culture will affect the entertainment landscape, especially within television. Recently, TV critic Ben Travers of IndieWire noted Hollywood's current purge as a mark of permanent change to, in his words, “the new golden age of television.” To his credit, Travers is careful not to cite the onslaught of shamed men as the end of premium entertainment, but rather a potential opportunity for a more inclusive industry. That specific hope echoes those of many BIPOC creators who have been working diligently against the very climate that has systemically boxed them out of opportunities.  
Related: TNT’S “CLAWS” CELEBRATES BLACK WOMEN’S SEXUALITY

The new HBO series is slated to do what Hollywood has done for decades: fictionalize very real Black pain for profit.

On Wednesday, HBO announced that after the conclusion of Game of Thrones, the network will tap the show creators, David Benioff and D.B. Weiss, for a new alternate history series called Confederate. The show is set in a fictionalized timeline where the South seceded from the Union and where slavery has continued into the modern era. The cast is complete with a suite of slave hunters, Confederate politicians, and even a group of slaveholding executives and the families they control. From the looks of it, HBO's new series Confederate is slated to do what Hollywood has done for decades: fictionalize very real Black pain for commercial profit. After all, this show’s premise proposes to create a “fictionalized” plot about the continuation of slavery, as if thousands of American farmers and corporations didn't continue to practice slavery well into the 1940s. The show acts as if the latter half of the twentieth century didn't see America's prison population swell with millions of Black bodies. It pretends that today’s prisons and venerable corporations don't exploit the 13th amendment to profit from forced prison labor. HBO’s Confederate imagines that there aren't more people under state control today than there were in chains at the peak of American slavery.
Related: THEY CANCELED “UNDERGROUND” BECAUSE WHITE PEOPLE DON’T LIKE NON-COMPLIANT SLAVES

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