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If you really want Black women to "save you", do us all a favor and save yourself.

Last night, America watched as Alabama held an election as to who would hold the Senate seat. In a close race, Republican Roy Moore lost the race by 20,000 votes to Democrat Doug Jones. So many are stunned by the Democrat victory in a deep red state, but it's not so much who won this Senate race than who is still being fetishized that bothers me. We've seen this spotlighted since the 2016 presidential election — when the poll breakdown by race and gender are published, the numbers confirm what Black women* have known since the dawn of time: we are one of the very few, if not the only, community that has consistently voted in the interest of human rights. Yet, our voting choices has always been weaponized against us; turned around from being an act of self-preservation into one that assuages white folks' racist guilt, giving them an opportunity to "thank Black women for saving [us]". Here's a news flash: We never belonged to you. This morning, my social media was flooded with posts from "well-meaning" to obtuse non-Black folks who mentioned the same fetishizing nonsense we've been seeing since politics turned into a dystopian nightmare for everyone else. Amidst the "Black women saved us," and "Black women voted for us," there's an afterthought of supporting Black women. But these bare minimum posts signal nothing more than finding another way to assert power over Black women. The bar is set on the ground if white folks are using a Senate election as the push they need to finally understand that this country is built on white supremacy. But even more than that, it is no more than an opportunistic ploy to once again treat Black women like the mammies or mules they want us to be. You can set a watch to the timing of white supremacy using Black women for their own means. In centering Black women's voting track record, this means that Black women are collectively robbed of their personal autonomy. When the first thought that comes to the minds of non-Black folks is that anything Black women do is for anyone but themselves, we are moving to take ownership of Black women. Plain and simple. To assert that kind of power over a marginalized group is an extension of the white supremacy that already hangs over our heads.
Related: PRACTICAL WAYS WHITE ALLIES CAN INFLUENCE THEIR COMMUNITIES

A quick explainer on everything up to date for the Republican ACA repeal and replace effort.

What happened?

Republicans have been threatening the repeal of the Affordable Care Act, commonly referred to as Obamacare,  before it even passed into law in 2010.  Seven years and several failed attempts later, the Senate Republicans are one step closer to making good on their threats.  Yesterday the Senate voted 51-50 to begin debate on an Obamacare repeal plan.  All 48 Democrats voted against the motion; while all but two Republicans voted in favor of the motion, including Senator John McCain who is being treated for a fatal form of brain cancer that was discovered thanks to taxpayer-provided health insurance.  Only two Republicans, Susan Collins of Maine and Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, joined Democrats in voting against the motion.

What’s next?

Now that the procedural motion has passed, Senators will begin debating.  There are and were three proposals up for Senate consideration: 1) Better Care Reconciliation Act (BRCA) which would have taken healthcare insurance away from 22 million people, 2) Obamacare Repeal Reconciliation Act (ORRA) which would repeal and not replace, leaving 32 million without healthcare insurance, and 3) ”Skinny Repeal” which would leave most of the ACA in place but would eliminate a tax and the mandates on employers and individuals.  BRCA failed with a 43-57 vote. Each party will receive 10 hours of floortime for debate.  During this time, Senators will take turns making speeches about healthcare.  The 20 hours will likely stretch over the span of a few days.  After the 20 hours is complete, a series of amendments will be added to the original bill.  Each amendment requires 51 votes to be approved and must be relevant to healthcare. Once all approved amendments are added, majority leader, Senator Mitch McConnell, will offer a final bill, which will encompass the plan Senate Republicans want to pass. The final bill will go up for a vote; it will need 51 votes to pass.  In the event of a tie, Vice President Mike Pence can vote. Related: THE MILITARY IS AN IMPERIALIST TOOL, BUT THE BAN ON TRANS FOLKS IS DEHUMANIZING AS FUCK

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