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Beyoncé creates space for Blackness regardless of her audience, and it's empowering to witness.

By Jazmine Joyner Beyoncé officially changed the game, again, this past Saturday. Her performance at Coachella not only broke streaming records for the festival, but when she took the stage, she also became the first Black woman to ever headline the massively popular music festival, to which she responded, “Ain’t that a bitch?” "Beychella"— a phrase coined by DJ Khaled to describe the impact Beyoncé's performance had on the festival — was a celebration of Black culture, specifically Black collegiate culture, with shout-outs to HBCU Fraternities and Sororities, marching bands, and step teams. Beyoncé created one of the Blackest performances I have ever seen performed at Coachella. Her mother, Tina Lawson, shared on Instagram her concerns for her daughter's performance; “I told Beyoncé that I was afraid that the predominately white audience at Coachella would be confused by all of the Black culture and Black college culture, because it was something that they might not get.” Her daughter’s response to these concerns were thoughtful, “I have worked very hard to get to the point where I have a true voice, and at this point in my life and my career I have a responsibility to do what's best for the world and not what is most popular.” Beychella was by far the most impressive performance I have ever seen put on by any performer. She took the Coachella stage, and gave one hell of a show. Coachella is the ultimate white space—an overpriced festival for privileged white kids to go out into the desert and wear problematic outfits and dance to their favorite bands. It wasn’t until 2014 that the festival started hosting more of a variety of mainstream hip-hop and R&B acts on its lineup. Past headliners were mostly white, featuring Arcade Fire, Red Hot Chili Peppers, Phoenix, and Kings of Leon.
Related: WITH “LEMONADE,” BEYONCÉ MIXED AN ELIXIR THAT BROUGHT ME BACK TO MYSELF

What is more American than football? Shaming Janet Jackson & hiring Justin Timberlake for round two.

Another week, another shitty, entitled white dude in the music industry enjoying success after violating a Black woman. Page Six confirmed last week that Justin “Ramen-Haired Culture Vulture” Timberlake will be headlining Super Bowl LII in February 2018 — it’s his first appearance at the show since his performance in 2004. What happened the last time he performed? Let’s recap. Queen of R&B Janet Jackson headlined Super Bowl XXXVIII on February 1, 2004, performing alongside Nelly, P. Diddy, and Kid Rock. Timberlake joined Jackson to perform a duet of his song “Rock Your Body” — in an incident infamously now known as “Nipplegate”, Timberlake ripped off a piece of Jackson’s costume, exposing her breast to the world for a half second. Cue America collectively losing its puritanical, racist, misogynist shit. Michael Powell, FCC Chairman at the time, called it a “classless, crass, and deplorable stunt” that was a “new low” from prime time television. Timberlake also issued a brief apology, and subsequently distanced himself from Jackson. Years later, these dumbasses went on to publicly regret how they handled the controversy: Powell called the public’s reaction “unfair,” pointing out how it was Timberlake who ripped off her costume, and Timberlake noted that he got “maybe 10 percent of the blame” and that America was especially harsh on non-white women. There aren’t enough eye rolls in the world for this shit, folks. Of course, Jackson alone shouldered the entirety of the blame and consequences for the “wardrobe malfunction.” Confirmed as recently as 2014, she was also barred by the NFL from any future performances at the Super Bowl. Her songs and music videos were blacklisted from all Viacom properties including MTV, and her invitation to perform in honor of Luther Vandross at the Grammys the following week was rescinded.
Related: WE DON’T CARE ABOUT BLACK WOMEN AND FEMMES, SO WE NEED #SAYHERNAME

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