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White women are weaponizing their emotions and femininity to assert their power over BIPOC. This isn't new, but it is dangerous.

If you've been paying attention to anything in the news lately, then you've seen the onslaught of headlines about racialized violence. Across the country, Black people are facing a continuous waves of anti-Blackness at the hands of white folks calling the police on them, simply for existing in public. While this may read as a new way for white people to assume their racism onto Black people, it actually isn't anything new at all. #ExistingWhileBlack illustrates the history of anti-Blackness that reigns throughout U.S. history and reminds us of the ways that white people — and particularly, white women — are evolving their white fragility to keep anti-Black racism thriving. To call the police on Black people, no matter the reasoning, is violent in and of itself simply because the act cannot be separated from historical context. In the last decade alone, we've seen how police brutality has led to the murders of Black people across all genders and ages throughout the country. We've seen documentation of how systemic and systematic anti-Blackness is, and how it permeates Black communities at all economic levels. Most recently, in Oakland, California, a white woman called the police on a Black family having a cookout in a public park because they weren't in a "grilling approved section" of the park. A Starbucks store manager in Philadelphia called the police on two Black men waiting for a friend. A mother and daughter in Brooklyn were accused of shoplifting at a vintage store in Williamsburg, where they were also handcuffed and searched by police. A group of Black filmmakers (including Bob Marley's granddaughter) had the police were called on her and a group of fellow Black filmmakers checking out of an AirBnB because she didn't smile to a white neighbor who claimed that they were robbers. A Yale student called campus police on another Yale grad student for napping in her common room. The list goes on and on but these seemingly random instances reinforce the assertion of dominance that white people are fighting to keep hold of over Black people.
Related: WHITE PEOPLE: STOP WEAPONIZING OUR EMOTIONS TO AVOID YOUR RACISM

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Ironically nicknamed Land of the Free, the United States is the world’s #1 jailer. The U.S. represents only five percent of the world’s population, but 25 percent of the world’s inmates are here. By the close of 2010, America had 1,267,000 people behind bars in state prisons, 744,500 in local jails, and 216,900 in federal facilities—more than 2.2 million people in total. 1 in 5 inmates are low level drug offenders, and Black people are 10 times more likely to be incarcerated for drugs than whites despite using drugs at roughly the same rates. Those who are released from prison are often still under state surveillance, and as a consequence, they are subject to discrimination that contributes to America’s 76 percent recidivism rate. Most people who were incarcerated are required to have employment as a condition of their parole. Employers, however, are allowed to screen people with felonies during the application process, making it difficult for formerly incarcerated folks to get a job and feed themselves and their families.
Related: A Primer On The Prison Industrial Complex

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