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With Ramadan’s end comes prayers of peace, hope and fulfillment.

Ramadan is almost over and as always it’s been an extremely busy holy month for Muslims. Fasting and worship aside, Ramadan means so much to so many people around the world. Here are some highlights, both good and bad, from this year’s Ramadan. Charity projects received much attention this year, as they always do. However, because of islamophobic narratives of Muslims in many parts of the world, charitable causes gained even more prominence than usual. LaunchGood, the crowdfunding website of choice for and by Muslims, started the Ramadan Challenge, where donors received a daily email with suggested projects to support. Ordinary Muslims from all over the world supported diverse projects such as refugee relief, children’s playgrounds and Arabic classes.
Related: THESE MUSLIM GROUPS ARE CARING FOR THE ENVIRONMENT AS PART OF THEIR FAITH

Ramadan is one of those times when non-Muslims have many questions, but aren't quite sure how to ask them. It’s time for a primer on this month and all that it entails.

Ramadan, the holiest month of the Islamic calendar, is upon us once more. More than 1.6 billion Muslims all over the world—more than 23% of the world population—is celebrating this month in some way or another. In the United States, anywhere from 1 to 6 million Muslims (depending on the estimates), will be participating in Ramadan. This year has already begun with some terrible news involving Muslims: two girls were harassed for being Muslim (only one of them actually was) in Portland by a white supremacist, and their defenders were killed.  
Related: Want to Learn About Muslims? Pick Up a Book. Or Ten.

Master of None promotes a vision of America that is enriched by the complexities of its immigrant communities, instead of persistent racist narratives.

In Aziz Ansari’s Master of None, Dev Shah is an aspiring actor living in New York City. He’s cute, charming, and a gourmand obsessed with pasta. His love life is equal parts adorable and painful. Oh, and he’s also an American of Indian origin, a fact that shapes how Dev moves through the world, but only becomes a big deal when we look at the serious lack of diversity in television today. Like the Wachowski Sisters’ Sense8, the diversity in Master of None is thoughtfully presented as a natural matter of course of life in NYC. Dev’s best friends are a white dude (Eric Wareheim), a black lesbian (Lena Waithe), and a first gen Chinese-American man (Kelvin Yu). He and his Desi actor buddy, Ravi (Ravi Patel) commiserate over their stereotyped casting calls and auditions. Dev dates women of all ethnicities and types, and through his relationship with Rachel (Noël Wells) becomes a feminist ally — basically, he’s a freaking unicorn. A brown dude as not just a lead of his own show, but a romantic lead at that, is groundbreaking for the South Asian American community. Master of None just aired its marvelous second season on Netflix and it is some serious balm for the troubled soul, in many ways especially because of how compassionately it tackles the issues of being an immigrant in the United States. Like the actor portraying him, Dev Shah is a first generation immigrant who has only known life in the USA, unlike his parents who came over from India with great difficulty. While every immigrant family has a unique story, Master of None thoughtfully shows the threads that bind these disparate life experiences. Related: 9 Desi Feminist Activists You Need to Know 

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