f

Get in on this viral marvel and start spreading that buzz! Buzzy was made for all up and coming modern publishers & magazines!

Fb. In. Tw. Be.

Donate Now            Our Story           Our Team            Contact Us             Shop

The reason we don't hear more about Black serial killers is not because they don't exist. It's because their victims are rarely newsworthy enough to get the same amount of coverage as white victims.

This essay contains discussion of serial murder and r/pe. Please use discretion. Even the most depraved and gruesome of the white serial killers who dominated headlines once upon a time continue to be intimately and sometimes even fondly explored through television, film, podcasts, and other forms of entertainment. The most prominent of these killers, who continues to dwell in the social imagination long after his execution, is Ted Bundy—idealized in a way that frames his crimes as more sophisticated than they really were and his acumen as more impressive than it really was. Our culture’s framing of white serial killers like Bundy as tortured geniuses only serves to memorialize them while allowing their celebrity to overshadow the lives they stole. It’s irresponsible. As is this same culture’s neglect for the crimes committed by Black serial killers, so much so that many people continue to say they’ve “never heard of a Black serial killer” and the myth they don’t exist is regularly perpetuated. I bring these two things into conversation with one another because I believe their connection is significant. These two phenomena—both the glamorizing of white serial killers and the obscurity of Black serial killers—are so prevalent because white men are continually afforded humanity and individualism while Black men are pathologized as inherently violent and animalistic, and because society devalues the victims that Black serial killers primarily target. The documentary “Unseen” (2016) focuses on the crimes of Anthony Sowell, a man who served fifteen years for a rape he committed in 1989. In early 2009, a woman named Gladys Wade filed a police report against him, stating that he had sexually assaulted her and tried to kill her. Despite there being visible bruises and blood on her neck, police called her claim “unfounded” and determined that there was “insufficient evidence” to make an arrest. In their report, Wade was described as “not credible” as a victim. That same year, Vanessa Gay was held hostage and raped by Sowell. She also found a decapitated body decomposing in his home. Gay managed to convince Sowell that she wouldn’t tell anyone about what he’d done if he let her go. She called the police to inform them about what had happened and what she had seen, but because she never filed an official police report, the incident was never investigated.
Related: THE INSIDIOUS LINK BETWEEN INCELS, SERIAL KILLERS AND THEIR TARGETING OF SEX WORKERS

Valerie Castile’s words of anger and mourning mix into a strong potion of Black rage, one that is holy in its justification and righteous in its power.

By Devyn Springer
TW// Police Brutality, Violence, Death A little under a year ago on July 6th, Philando Castile was shot and killed by officer Jeronimo Yanez while driving with his girlfriend and her four-year-old daughter. What was supposed to be a simple traffic stop turned into a death sentence for Castile an occurrence that is beginning to seem routine for Black people. Castile’s death went viral causing mass protests and uprisings across the U.S. and particularly across Minnesota, where the killing occurred. This was largely due to the fact that Castile’s girlfriend Diamond Reynolds, live-streamed the tragedy on Facebook. While the medical examiners ruled Castile’s death a homicide – stating he had sustained multiple gunshot wounds – last week, officer Yanez was acquitted of all charges sparking a new round of nationwide protests, upset, and Black rage. While the majority of us are aware of the dangers of putting our hopes for justice into the same system responsible for our deaths, Black America also intently awaits for the chance to taste tiny slivers of victory by sending murderous officers to jail.
Related: ON PHILANDO CASTILE, AKAI GURLEY, AND NON-BLACK PEOPLE OF COLOR’S COMPLICITY IN ANTI-BLACKNESS

You don't have permission to register