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The power of Janet Mock rests in her accessibility and relatability.

Goddesses must bless Amazon’s algorithms because in late spring 2014 Janet Mock’s bounteous afro halo was featured in a little thumbnail picture of related interests thanks to my previous purchases. In her first book, "Redefining Realness," I gained a mentor who ushered me into the early days of my transition in the nascent dawn of my recovery from addiction. I desperately needed the guidance. In addition to hormonal direction, it was the anecdotes which chimed with my personal experiences and illuminated the path I was on with familiarity. [caption id="attachment_46780" align="aligncenter" width="263"] Redefining Realness: My Path to Womanhood, Identity, Love & So Much More By Janet Mock[/caption] A fountain of veracity and authenticity – Mock spoke truth to power in a way that brought sunshine into my life – the snap of her intellect and an almighty wit was matched by the snatched image on her book cover. A vision in skin tight coral, Janet is the strong feminist trans goddess promising me with the assuredness of Olivia Pope, the determination of Maxine Waters and tenacity of Tina Knowles that it will all get much better– and soon. In her newest book, "Surpassing Certainty," Janet Mock claims her throne as the trans advocate and ultimate possibility model for trans women of color the world over. Her second memoir is a work of life writing dripping in sex positivity and a testament to sex worker inclusive feminism. The gaze of the uninitiated reader is averted from the usual topics of a medical and social transition. Instead, the trans-ness of the author was woven together like a tapestry of her life as a whole. [caption id="attachment_46779" align="aligncenter" width="265"] Surpassing Certainty: What My Twenties Taught Me By Janet Mock[/caption] Enshrined in the uniqueness of her story, are precise and revealing descriptions of the hot messiness of adult emotional life fueled and defined by love. The epic nature of her first love for her husband Troy, is complimented by a pursuit for meaning across state lines. There are many characters who help our heroine along the way into a popping media career peppered with pop-culture and seasoned with the sadness of too-late realizations. We are schooled as to how to escape the weighty burdens of unconscious privilege, pretty privilege, good hair privilege, cis-passing privilege. Janet Mock just owns the deck that she was dealt and it makes her more likeable. Her self-awareness promises that our own honesty can liberate us too.
Related: A LOVE LETTER TO SERENA WILLIAMS

Not only does Matt Bomer’s portrayal of a transgender woman enable violence against trans women, it also takes away yet another job from a trans person.

TW/CW – Mentions of transmisogyny and physical violence against trans women.
In yet another setback for the transgender community, the film Anything written and directed by Timothy McNeil, premiered mid-June at the Los Angeles Film Festival. The film portrays cis male actor, Matt Bomer as a transgender woman who enters a relationship with a widower (John Carroll Lynch) who recently moved to Los Angeles. Cis people playing and being rewarded for their roles as trans people is nothing new — Robert Reeds, Elle Fanning, Jared Leto, Hilary Swank, Jeffrey Tambor, Eddie Redmayne and many other cis actors have portrayed the roles of trans people in both film and television. The transgender community has repeatedly criticized these films because we are being misrepresented and this is deeply troubling because only 16% of the population knows someone who is transgender. However, our critiques and demands for fair representation are continuously ignored as the film industry keeps hiring cis actors to portray us, ultimately leading us to wondering why this persists.
Related: 4 WAYS TO SUPPORT YOUR TRANS WOMAN PARTNER AND FIGHT TRANSPHOBIA

I firmly believe that one cannot utter the words Black Lives Matter and exclude Black sex workers.

I am a semi-out sex worker. By semi-out I mean I’m internet out: I haven’t announced anything to most of my family and the “in-real-life” people who need to know, know. I have dabbled in a bit of everything, from stripping to prostitution to sugaring to camming. I am also an artist, freelancer and homeschooling mother, so there is a lot of nuance in what I desire out of life for my son and I. My only other avenue would be minimum or below-poverty level wages. When I write, I focus on sex workers of color. Most of the time I narrow it even further to Black sex workers and Black trans sex workers who face the most ire, discrimination and violence from both the police and within the Black community. I wrote a series of Twitter threads on sex work that discussed sex worker rights and briefly mentioned our place in Black Lives Matter. Here is one of them.
Related: FOR BLACK SEX WORKERS, THE DECK IS ALREADY STACKED AGAINST US

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