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To ban us from the military not only feels like an attack on my humanity, but also an insult to my intelligence.

Today, I woke up from an uncomfortable night’s sleep to the news that President Donald Trump is now banning transgender people from serving in the military. I don’t know what’s more of an insult – being denied humanity and my right to choice, or the fact that he even thought I’d want to serve as a tool in his imperialist machine in the first place. The sentiments I feel about this decision are not cut and dry because there are so many implications – good and bad. Is this fucked up? Yes, and here is why: This first thing I think about is all of the transgender Americans currently serving in the military who have been struck with this news. Of the 1,3 million active duty members of the military, 2,450 are transgender, according to a study by the RAND Corporation. What of them? How will they be protected moving forward? What access to resources will they have if they're ejected? What transitionary systems will be put into place to accommodate for this sudden strip of human rights? How will they be safe from this legalized bigotry that will instigate stigmatization from their peers in the barracks?   I am actively working towards a world without police and prisons, including ending the military industry which has been used and weaponized against Black and Brown people for centuries to dominate and exploit our communities. As a Black trans woman in America, I would in no way want to be a pawn in that game at all–but the fight for trans inclusion in the military hasn’t just been about us fighting “for our country”– it’s more about us being able to have access to resources and choices.
Related: #JUSTICEFOREYRICKA HIGHLIGHTS A TRANS WOMAN’S ABUSE IN PRISON

Facing political instability on its anniversary, Black Lives Matter presents an energetic new game plan.

After fours years of rapid national expansion, the future of the Black Lives Matter movement is uncertain. The 2016 presidential election of Donald Trump and the concurrent Republican sweep of Congress radically transformed the national political landscape. And for advocacy organizations like the Black Lives Matter Network, the prospect of garnering nationwide policy change has plummeted. In the first half of this year, the organization has spent much time recoiling from this conservative revolution. Both the Washington Post and BuzzFeed have reported a slowdown in BLM street protests. And in a recent NPR interview, Black Lives Matter network co-founder, Patrisse Khan-Cullors referred to the movement’s national prospects as “devastating.” However last week, on its fourth anniversary, the BLM Network took account of the movement’s victories to date and articulated a robust new game plan for operating in Trump's America moving forward. In the 55 page report, organizers sketched out how a localized, intersectional agenda can keep the movement’s momentum going during this time of political uncertainty.
Related: RACIST UBER INCIDENT INDICATIVE OF SYSTEMIC FAILINGS

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