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Voter registration drives are no longer impeded by bombings, but stringent new laws that require multiple IDs and other hurdles.

James Chaney, Andrew Goodman, and Michael Schwerner. Many won’t recognize these names, but as the Trump administration and other lawmakers make unprecedented attempts to disenfranchise voters, it is even more important that we be reminded of those who fought and died for our right to vote. These three men were just a few of the thousands of volunteers who participated in the Mississippi Summer Project, also known as Freedom Summer, in 1964. The Congress on Racial Equality (CORE), Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), and other civil rights groups organized the campaign in an effort to expand Black voter-ship in the south. In a state where Blacks made up one-third of the population, only 6 percent were registered to vote. Busloads of mostly white activists arrived in Mississippi to assist these grassroots efforts, but weren't prepared for the lengths that residents, business owners, local and federal governments would go to keep structural racism intact.
Related: NORTH CAROLINA LOBBIES TO SUPPRESS BLACK VOTE BY LIMITING VOTING HOURS

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