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I could no longer ignore a glaring fact about Lynch’s new Twin Peaks: It is fueled by troubling cultural appropriation.

I’ve been a serious and passionate Twin Peaks fan since the 1990s. I’ve written a weekly column on a popular fan site since before The Return. I founded my own Facebook Bookhouse of old-timers that I hear tell is one of the most productive and decent fan communities with almost zero trolling and wonderful discussions. As a woman of color — and one of an even more niche community of Twin Peaks fans of color — I’ve been a vocal and staunch defender of David Lynch’s work as not racist and sexist, and I’ve theoretically situated The Return in the framework of Brechtian theatre principles and socio-cultural satire. I’ve done my part to feature the voices of other fans of color, as well as actively advocate for rape and trauma survivors through my writing and participation in fan communities. I watched Twin Peaks: The Return from an unabashed female and feminist gaze, and found much of Lynch’s commentary to be powerful and empowering. Twin Peaks has been like an imaginary home to me for decades, and a place where I was able to accomplish a great deal of healing and self-development. But after the surreal and disturbing finale, and slowly coming out of the haze that has been these past three months, I could no longer ignore a glaring fact about Lynch’s new Twin Peaks: It is fueled by troubling cultural appropriation.
Related: “TWIN PEAKS” IS OVERWHELMINGLY WHITE, SO WHY DO FANS OF COLOR KEEP WATCHING IT?

Tattoos were invented by brown and Black people centuries—even millennia—before white supremacy became the dominant global paradigm.

You’ve taken the time, done your research, and decided on your tattoo. You’ve saved up money and investigated tattoo shops for the perfect artist to mark your design. You’re excited, nervous, and eager to get started. But the tattooer takes one look at you and says, “Your skin tone is a problem.” Never mind that you’ve seen tattoos on dark skin, and with color no less. Hell, your brown or Black self has beautiful color tattoos which have stood the test of time. Yet here is this artist you respected, admired, and sought out to give them a lot of money to tattoo you, and they’re looking at you like you dragged dog shit into the place. Suddenly you feel sick to your stomach—and not from tattoo nerves. You’ve just been skin-shamed. As a heavily tattooed biracial Sri Lankan American woman, this scenario has played out for me again and again, in context of almost every single tattoo artist with whom I’ve ever consulted. Worse, even brown tattooers who are covered head to foot in designs have frowned at my skin and played that I’m going to be really difficult to tattoo. I’ve had to put my foot down, explain how my particular melanin works and what colors will stick, and hope for the best. Or walk out and start researching artists from scratch.
Related: GOOD SOUTH ASIAN GIRLS DON’T HAVE TATTOOS (AND THAT’S WHY I’M COVERED IN THEM)

The Kardashian-Jenners will keep stealing from Black women because they are never held accountable for their actions.

By Tiffanie Woods

Khloe Kardashian and Kylie Jenner are officially cancelled. The Kardashian-Jenner clan are no strangers to being accused of cultural appropriation or stealing from Black culture, but they have gone the extra mile with their latest ventures. Both have been accused of stealing ideas and copying from independent Black-owned companies with their newest brand drops. They have clearly thrown all fucks out of the window.

When Kylie announced her new all-camo line was going to be added to the Kylie Shop via an Instagram post, it was only a matter of hours before Black twitter and the independent Black owned label Plugged NYC called Jenner out for copying the line's designs – including its most notable pieces – the orange and black camo pants which have been worn by both Rihanna and KeKe Palmer.

Plugged NYC also came with the receipts, revealing that Jenner had previously ordered multiple pieces from the shop and even asked them to make custom color options for her. A simple Twitter search of "Kylie Shop" reveals multiple tweets and screen-grabs showing how Kylie and her team obviously copied the indie brand.

[embed]https://twitter.com/kelshareese/status/872986310377697281?ref_src=twsrc%255Etfw&ref_url=http%253A%252F%252Fthesnobette.com%252F2017%252F06%252Fkylie-jenner-steal-plugged-nyc-camo%252F[/embed]

   

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