White nationalists at home are more dangerous than nuclear weapons abroad.

Before this weekend’s acts of terror in Charlottesville, the news cycle has been ruled by alarmist coverage of a possible nuclear attack from North Korea.  Trump promised to meet North Korea with “fire and fury like the world has never seen” if Kim Jung-un continued to threaten the United States.  Trump double down on his fire and fury statement, saying “it’s about time somebody stuck up for the people of this country.”  

But when it came time for Trump to “stick up” for those who were being terrorized by the white supremacists in Charlottesville, he wavered. Instead of calling terrorism by its name, Trump vaguely condemned violence “on many sides.” This statement attempts to compare literal nazis to those who oppose the hatred and violence they stand for.

This weekend, white nationalists marched on Charlottesville, Virginia in opposition of the removal of a statue of Confederate leader Robert E. Lee. These white men and women — who have been emboldened by the Trump Administration’s endorsement of white supremacy — converged on the University of Virginia’s campus bearing Tiki torches and Make America Great Again hats.  The next day, more armed white supremacists flocked to the city ready for a fight.  As a result of this racist assembly, a peaceful counter protester has been killed after being intentionally run over by a car.  At least 19 others were injured by the same car.  

Related: WHAT WE NEED WHITE ALLIES TO DO ABOUT THE WHITE SUPREMACISTS IN VIRGINIA

Unfortunately, this incident is not surprising nor is it the first time white supremacists have initiated violence and destruction.  The images and racist rhetoric coming from the white nationalist assembly is a reminder that racism, hate, and bigotry did not die in the 1960s as history books and cable news would have you believe.

This particular political climate is reminiscent of the the 1960s era vilification of the Vietcong by the United States government while Black people were getting beaten, bombed, and lynched by white police officers and civilians on American soil.  

Muhammad Ali’s quote “[The Vietcong] never called me nigger. They never lynched me. They never put no dogs on me,” could be said today in response to the United States’s portrayal of Kim Jung-un and the North Korean regime as it ignores police brutality and racially motivated hate crimes.

Related: WHITE SUPREMACY AND ISLAMOPHOBIA LIVE EVERYWHERE, INCLUDING LIBERAL COMMUNITIES

Charlottesville, Ferguson, Sanford, and Baltimore are recent examples that show us white people are the most immediate threat to American’s safety. This threat is not abstract. It is up close and personal. It is a threat rooted in history and context. It is a threat that is ever-present.

White people have caused more injuries and deaths of Americans than Kim Jong-un ever could.  The president and other politicians need to act based on that needful fact. Cable news and major publications should disseminate information based on that needful fact.

Kim Jong-un has never called me nigger, but white people have. And my fears and anxieties are based on that needful fact.

 

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