Being Brown and queer in counterculture spaces can be challenging enough, even with the “perfect” body. But San Cha bares it all.

🌹❤ @fotobymateo 🌹❤

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To hear her without seeing her is to learn she is a force. Yet feasting your eyes on San Cha is instant confirmation. This unapologetically Latinx singer/songwriter/musician is a grunge goddess, folding a savage grit into the rich timbre of her voice that makes you daydream of Lola Beltrán and Patti Smith having a brilliant-ass baby together.

Being Brown and queer in counterculture spaces can be challenging enough, even with the “perfect” body. Yet San Cha bares it all, her body an integral part of her instrument. She does so rebelliously and joyfully. This week, the young artist talked to Wear Your Voice about how celebrating her body comes into play in her art and everyday life for our series on intersectional body positivity.

Name: San Cha
Age: 29
Hometown: San Jose, CA
Current Location: Los Angeles, CA
Website: elsancha.bandcamp.com
Instagram: @el_sancha

Wear Your Voice: How long have you been a musician/recording artist?

San Cha: I started playing music at eight years old. I started recording my own music at 19.

#tbt 📷📷📷 @alanbalthazar_ ❤❤❤

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WYV: What inspired you to start recording music?

SC: The cosmos, the Selena murder and the catholic church.

Related: 9 Moments When “Selena” Proves It’s a Feminist Film — Especially for Women of Color

WYV: Are there any BOPO themes in your music or art?

SC: On stage, I dress the way I’ve always been told I couldn’t and shouldn’t. My body is my instrument. My body is my magic, so I show a lot of it.

Para toda la familia @urheinous y yo ♒♎

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WYV: What do you like about the BOPO movement? How is it successful or helpful?

SC: Seeing a gorgeous lady/person/boi looking fabulous and loving themselves is so revolutionary and to hear people like Virgie Tovar, or seeing fabulous fashion pix on Wear Your Voice Mag or seeing the work of organizations like Nalgona Positivity [Pride] give us validation and are live and active affirmations.

WYV: What do you not like about it? How is it failing?

SC: I have no complaints about a movement telling you to love yourself.

💖

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WYV: How has BOPO affected you personally?

SC: When I’m not on a stage and I’m working with people who diet and “don’t wanna get fat!” or tell me that I should wear a bra because my boobs will sag or tell me that I “let myself go” or tell me that they wanna start going to the gym and that I should go with them or tell me how to deal with my face/body hair, I have to remind myself how people in the BOPO movement respond to these situations. It’s helped me fight the urge to self-hate with them and let them dictate how I feel about myself.

WYV: How do you practice BOPO in your daily life?

SC: By blocking the haters and always trying to look cute. [laughs]

WYV: If you could define BOPO in one sentence or phrase, what would it be?

SC: Loving yourself is a revolutionary act.

📷🌹 @wishingiwasa @wfsufest

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