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The Fight Against Reproductive Rights Targets the Most Marginalized People

The Fight Against Reproductive Rights Targets the Most Marginalized People—Here is How You Can Help

Those disproportionately targeted by state violence for autonomy over their own bodies are fighting for reproductive rights and have been for a long time.

“There is no such thing as a single-issue struggle because we do not live single-issue lives.” This quote from Audre Lorde (“Learning from the Sixties,” 1982) has been rattling around in my head for the past week, as state after state has begun to dismantle Roe v. Wade by legally criminalizing abortion. Even while mainstream media has largely framed this moment as an assault on “women’s” reproductive rights, we should be wary of how this category is being wielded.

At its core, the criminalization of abortion is about the threat of losing one’s bodily autonomy to the state, and we have to remember that this threat is shared by trans people, Black people, sex workers, incarcerated people, poor people, disabled and undocumented people. To say that this moment is about an assault on “women,” then, is to deliberately overlook the racialized dimension of its violence.

There is perhaps no better illustration of this than the fact that the governor of Alabama who signed the anti-abortion law into being is herself a woman—a white woman, that is. The same is true for Terri Collins, one of Alabama’s Republican representatives in the House who originally sponsored the bill. And again, Brian Kemp, the governor who signed Georgia’s anti-abortion law, was himself voted into office with the blessings of 70% of white women in the state of Georgia.

The criminalization of abortion, then, shouldn’t be framed as an assault on women’s rights, but rather as an injunction to expand the state’s control over the bodies of poor people of color. Alabama is proposing criminal sentences of up to 99 years for abortion providers; Georgia is threatening to prosecute people who terminate their pregnancies after six weeks. Let’s pay attention to the carceral language being employed here.

In a recent NYT column, Michelle Goldberg noted that a post-Roe world would not be a regression toward a prior state of things, but a substantial worsening of them. Before Roe v. Wade, doctors were prosecuted for abortions but patients rarely were. This time, however, they would be. She writes: “Republican politicians in other states are clearly interested in locking women up; last month, Texas legislators held a hearing on a bill that would allow women who have abortions to be charged with homicide and potentially subject to the death penalty. In a post-Roe future, the political fight, at least in red states, could shift from whether women can have abortions to whether they can be imprisoned for them.”

What does this mean for the work that lies ahead? It means that the fight for reproductive autonomy must be firmly rooted in the fight for prison abolition. It means that the fight for reproductive autonomy must be inextricably linked to survivors’ rights, sex workers’ rights, and the #MeToo movement (which, let us not forget, was a movement begun in *Alabama* by *Black women*); to the abolition of ICE, border regimes and policing; to the fight for free healthcare, to safety for trans people and disabled people; to the fight for fair wages for workers everywhere.

Let us not forget that it has already been hard, for a long time, for those disproportionately targeted by state violence to exercise autonomy over their own bodies. By framing this moment as an assault on women, we risk sliding into a knee-jerk #PantsuitNation reaction, in which we contend that simply placing “women” (which women?) in positions of power will ameliorate conditions for the rest of us.

JOIN WEAR YOUR VOICE ON PATREON — Every single dollar matters to us—especially now when media is under constant threat.

When our analysis of feminism fails to be intersectional, it risks being co-opted into the violent forces of neoliberalism, as we have already seen with carceral feminist tactics that simply further the reach of the prison system by advocating harsher sentencing laws in cases of sexual assault, and as we are currently seeing in Europe with the rise of “femonationalism,” with white women in Germany and elsewhere justifying their xenophobia and racism in the language of “protecting [white] women’s rights.

With that being said, we can give our time and money to local abortion funds who have been in this fight for a long time. Why local abortion funds, rather than larger organizations such as Planned Parenthood? Although Planned Parenthood centers do good work, the clinics providing the majority of abortions in the US are independent abortion care providers, and they are currently the only providers in AL and many other states.

Abortion funds directly sponsor abortions at local, regional, and national levels, and together they form a network of over 70 grassroots organizations across the country. In 2017 they supported 28,837 people, but that was only 19% of the 152,000 calls the network received that year. As a result there is great unmet need and they need more support.

Many abortion funds are run and led by volunteers who answer phone calls, drive people to appointments, and coordinate events, and help people navigate barriers in addition to paying for procedures, by providing services such as transportation, child care payment, lodging, translation services, abortion doulas, and more. Abortion funds are autonomous in their structures and policies because they are experts in direct service to their communities across widely varying cultural and political geographies.

Below is a list of abortion funds to donate to or volunteer at as a clinic escort. If you cannot donate to them directly, contact them and ask what kinds of help or support they might need. Amplify them on social media. Subscribe to their newsletters and listservs to stay tuned for upcoming announcements.

ALABAMA

Yellowhammer Fund

DONATE HERE

VOLUNTEER FORM

Alabama Reproductive Rights Advocates

VISIT HERE

The Knights and Orchids Society, Inc.

VISIT HERE

Montgomery Area Reproductive Justice Coalition

VISIT HERE

ARIZONA

Abortion Fund of Arizona

VISIT HERE

NAPAWF Arizona Chapter

VISIT HERE

NARAL Pro-choice Arizona

VISIT HERE

Tucson Abortion Support Collective

VISIT HERE

ARKANSAS

Arkansas Abortion support network

VISIT HERE

Little Rock Family Planning

VISIT HERE

FLORIDA

Cascades Abortion Support Network

VISIT HERE

Women’s Emergency Network

VISIT HERE

Broward Emergency Fund

VISIT HERE

Emergency Medical Assistance, Inc.

VISIT HERE

GEORGIA

Access Reproductive Care Southeast

VISIT HERE

Feminist Women’s Health Center

VISIT HERE

Sistersong Women of Color Reproductive Justice Collective

VISIT HERE

SPARK

VISIT HERE

Sister Love

VISIT HERE

NARAL pro choice Georgia

VISIT HERE

NAPAWF Atlanta

VISIT HERE

INDIANA

All-Options Pregnancy Resource Center

VISIT HERE

KANSAS

Trust Women

VISIT HERE

Peggy Bowman Fund

VISIT HERE

KENTUCKY

EMW women’s clinic

VISIT HERE

KYA Fund

VISIT HERE

Kentucky Health Justice

VISIT HERE

LOUISIANA

Hope Medical Group for Women

VISIT HERE

NOLA Abortion fund

VISIT HERE

Women with a Vision

VISIT HERE

Reproductive Justice Action Collective

VISIT HERE

MICHIGAN

Summit Medical Center

VISIT HERE

Women’s Center of Flint

VISIT HERE

Northland Family Planning

VISIT HERE

In this Together Project

VISIT HERE

The Choice Fund

VISIT HERE

MISSISSIPPI

Jackson Women’s Health

VISIT HERE

Mississippi Reproductive Freedom Fund

VISIT HERE

MISSOURI

Naral Missouri

VISIT HERE

Gateway Access Fund

VISIT HERE

NEBRASKA

Abortion and contraception clinic

VISIT HERE

Abortion Access Fund

VISIT HERE

NEVADA

Nevada Now

VISIT HERE

Indigenous Women Rising

VISIT HERE

Young Women United

VISIT HERE

NEW MEXICO

New Mexico Religious Coalition for Reproductive Choice

VISIT HERE

Southwestern Women’s

VISIT HERE

NORTH CAROLINA

North Carolina abortion fund

VISIT HERE

Woman’s choice

VISIT HERE

Family reproductive health

VISIT HERE

NARAL pro choice NC

VISIT HERE

NORTH DAKOTA

Red River Women’s Clinic

VISIT HERE

North Dakota Women in Need Abortion Access Fund

VISIT HERE

OHIO

Preterm

VISIT HERE

New Voices

VISIT HERE

Women Have Options

VISIT HERE

Restoring Our Own Through Transformation

VISIT HERE

OKLAHOMA

Oklahoma religious coalition for reproductive choice

VISIT HERE

Oklahoma call for repro Justice

VISIT HERE

SOUTH CAROLINA

Greenville women’s clinic

VISIT HERE

South Carolina WREN

VISIT HERE

TENNESSEE

Memphis choices

VISIT HERE

Sister Reach

VISIT HERE

Healthy and Free TN

VISIT HERE

Knoxville Abortion Doulas

VISIT HERE

TEXAS

Abortion without Borders

VISIT HERE

TEA Fund

VISIT HERE

La Frontera Fund

VISIT HERE

Lilith Fund

VISIT HERE

Afiya Center

VISIT HERE

Whole woman’s health

VISIT HERE

Fund Texas choice

VISIT HERE

Cicada Collective

VISIT HERE

Clinic Access Support Network

VISIT HERE

VIRGINIA

Richmond Reproductive Freedom Fund

VISIT HERE

Falls Church Healthcare

VISIT HERE

Blue Ridge Abortion Fund

VISIT HERE

JOIN WEAR YOUR VOICE ON PATREON — Every single dollar matters to us—especially now when media is under constant threat. Your support is essential and your generosity is why Wear Your Voice keeps going! You are a part of the resistance that is needed—uplifting Black and brown feminists through your pledges is the direct community support that allows us to make more space for marginalized voices. For as little as $1 every month you can be a part of this journey with us. This platform is our way of making necessary and positive change, and together we can keep growing.

Lisa Hofmann-Kuroda is a queer, mixed, Japanese-American writer, educator, and organizer based in Iowa City, Iowa, with satellite homes and communities in Oakland, California, Tokyo, Japan, and Boston, Massachusetts. She completed her PhD in Japanese Studies at UC Berkeley (2018) and fights to hold universities accountable for their complicity in war, police and border violence, gentrification, prisons, and labor exploitation, among other things.

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