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Below is a short user’s guide to anti-fascism that we’ve developed, based on our personal experiences in attending and disrupting white supremacist rallies.

[This piece includes Anonymous contributors]
As anti-racist organizers, we frequently talk with people who wonder why we who oppose fascism, white supremacy, and other forms of organized violence feel compelled to show up to their assemblies to organize an opposition. Often, people will say some version of: "Don't feed the trolls," or "Just ignore them." This attitude describes what most people have been doing for many decades now. Yet this strategy of “looking the other way” is exactly what has allowed fascism and white supremacy to fester and grow unchecked. Despite mainstream accusations that fascism and white supremacy were being overblown or exaggerated, these forces have been expanding and merging, particularly over the past decade, in groups such as the KKK, Aryan Nation, Oath Keepers, Three Percenters, etc., as well as through newer groups such as Identity Evropa, the White Student Union, and the Alt-Right. Sadly, because many people haven't been keeping tabs on the rapid growth of white supremacist groups in the United States, they are now struggling to believe it's actually as bad as it is. But when fascist Nazis gather, they are recruiting and building an army and a movement that allows them to grow unchallenged. It is imperative that we do not allow them another inch of space to grow. It will only get harder if we don’t do the work now.
Related: PRACTICAL WAYS WHITE ALLIES CAN INFLUENCE THEIR COMMUNITIES

I’ve decided to remove my Black body from the war and reclaim my time. I care about the status of the country I live in, but this war is never-ending, and ultimately no longer mine to fight.

By Barbara Muhumuza August has been a tumultuous month — the climate has been packed with hateful bigotry which has created an atmosphere of fear for marginalized groups and our accomplices. I imagine that it can be unsettling to witness the reality of America's truth come to light, especially after being deluded for so long that this America was anything but the one it was created to be. Seeing the honest reflection that you, white people, have spent decades denying is quite probably difficult to absorb. For Black, indigenous and people of color (BIPOC), however, this is not new. Frankly, this is much more passive than the things we’ve seen and died for and from. That doesn’t make it any less of an issue, but how much longer must we put up with this rhetoric that this America — bold, hateful and willing to burn anything in the way of its need to upkeep white supremacy — is anything other than the America it has always been? Black people know that this America is the same America we were brought in chains to. This America is the same America that insidiously infiltrated and destroyed Black leaderships in order to prevent Black communal efforts of progress. This America is the same America that has always been inherently anti-black, anti-indigenous, anti-poor, anti-queer, anti-anything that isn’t white and rich.
Related: ALL WHITE PEOPLE ARE SOCIALIZED TO BE RACIST & TINA FEY MADE THAT CLEAR

Remaining politically neutral while a majority of the population faces systemic oppression is Taylor Swift’s trademark.

After a peaceful year of silence during her recluse from the public eye, I regret to inform you Taylor “Snake-Ass Becky” Swift is at it again. Swift’s name has resurfaced in the media over the past couple of weeks with the details of court proceedings in DJ David Mueller’s lawsuit and her respective countersuit making their way around the Internet. Mueller filed a $3 million lawsuit claiming defamation over Swift alleging that he sexually assaulted her at a meet-and-greet while she was on tour in 2013. The allegations, reported to his bosses by Swift’s mother, resulted in Mueller being fired from a Denver radio station. Mueller claimed that she ruined his career. Swift responded to the lawsuit by counter-claiming for sexual assault—she alleged that he grabbed her ass under her skirt while she posed for a photo with him and his girlfriend. She requested a whopping $1 in damages. Surprisingly, the judge hearing the case dismissed Mueller’s lawsuit and found that he was guilty of sexual assaulting Swift. She won her $1 and, in a statement, acknowledged “the privilege that she benefits from in life” that allowed her to afford legal counsel, and pledged to donate to organizations that help survivors of sexual violence defend themselves.
Related: INTERSECTIONALITY AIN’T FOR WHITE WOMEN

The claim that "intersectionality" should be used universally to speak for everyone's experiences is simply an extension of the anti-Black violence we already experience.

Remember that 2007 movie, Freedom Writers? In the film, Hilary Swank plays well-to-do naive teacher Erin Gruwell, who goes to teach 10th graders at Woodrow Wilson High School. In a scene where she (finally) begins to get checked for her white privilege, one of her students, Eva, spills into a stunning dialogue about her own life and survival that I still find myself thinking about to this day. Eva, staring right at Gruwell, says "[W]hite people always wanting their respect like they deserve it for free... see, I hate white people [because] I know what you can do... Except for 'cuz they can. And they can. Because they're white. So I hate white people on sight." Eva's dialogue reminds me so much of the pain that BIPOC have to carry to comfort and placate white women who believe that their well-intentions can make up for complacency in a white supremacist system. And of course, a lot of this well-intentioned "feminist allyship" comes in the co-option and theft of phrases specific to the Black experience, like intersectionality. Today, you would be hard-pressed to find a website or news outlet that boasts about its awareness of the current social justice landscape who hasn't used intersectionality to showcase just how "woke" they are. But the overuse of this term has created a warping of how we see and interact with each other, both in social justice spaces and beyond. In particular, the co-option of intersectionality has amplified something that BIW+oC have already known: when it comes to our interactions with white women, the anxiety around co-option and culture-vulturing is rooted in its inevitable reality because of the power dynamics that place white women as socially dominant. The relationship between Black folks and white women has been tumultuous, at best, because for too long this inequality has been unaddressed. In short, intersectionality — much like solidarity — isn't for white women.
Related: REMEMBERING SOJOURNER TRUTH, THE MOTHER OF INTERSECTIONAL FEMINISM

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