The pussy hats excluded trans women and women of color. Excluding the most vulnerable women from the conversation = white feminism at its best.

Today marked the largest and most peaceful protest in U.S. history. Women and men rallied together both domestically and abroad to advocate for women’s rights and to resist Donald Trump’s inauguration. The largest march took place in Los Angeles with estimates of more than 750,000 people. Washington D.C. also had an unprecedented turnout of more than 500,000 people. There’s nothing better than a good old-fashioned villain to unite people, huh?

That being said, there was a major point of contention at the march: the pussy hats. The hats excluded trans women, as well as women of color. The pussy hats imply that you must have specific genitalia to identify as a woman. Additionally, they excluded women of color by insinuating that  pussies must be pink. I guess this is why, for the most part, the only women you saw wearing the pink pussy hats were white.

Image from Business Insider

Image from Business Insider.

Excluding the most vulnerable women from the conversation = white feminism at its best. 

On a positive note, this did not hinder many women from gathering to highlight their intersecting identities and to stand for marginalized women at the march. To the women who are advocating for the the collective advancement of ALL women: We see you.  You remind us  of Audre Lorde’s timely words:

“I am not free while any woman is unfree, even when her shackles are very different from my own.”

Related: The Women’s March Isn’t the Only March on Washington this Weekend

Janet Mock Uplifts Trans Lives at D.C.’s Women’s March

Check out the highlights:

No pussy hats here: Wear Your Voice founder Ravneet Vohra leading her daughters in Los Angeles

Wear Your Voice founder Ravneet Vohra leading her daughter and son in Los Angeles.

Feminist writer Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie representing in D.C.

Feminist writer Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
representing in D.C.

16244997_10212300365412861_1013496694_o

16196626_971647703694_536931697_o-1

16229594_971649984124_1860178131_o

16244823_971651975134_865696695_o

16196718_10212300366652892_503968354_o-1

unnamed-7

The Wear Your Voice team with the queen of intersectional feminism, Kimberle Crenshaw.

unnamed

Actress and Singer Cree Summer holding it down in Los Angeles

unnamed-7

unnamed-1

Correction: Wear Your Voice founder Ravneet Vohra has a son and a daughter. An earlier version of this article stated that she marched with her daughters. We regret the error. 

Comments