In a world of people asking to be heard, whose various voices could be lifted, Lena Dunham still opts to support disenfranchised, vaguely chubby, mostly white women attempting to socially divorce themselves from their privilege but still milking every ounce out of their Ivy League connections and their rich parents’ wallets.

The recent collaboration between Dunham, best friend Jemima Kirke, and New Zealand-based lingerie company Lonely Label, disappointingly, does not feel much different.

Lena & Jemima for Lonely Girls ♡ Shot by @zaraeloise in NYC for #lonelygirlsproject

A photo posted by Lonely Lingerie (@lonelylingerie) on

Lonely makes lingerie that is beautiful and fashion-forward, simultaneously delicate and edgy. The aesthetic is not the issue, however; Lonely’s sizes stop at a 36DD bra and the bottoms go no larger than a 35-inch waist — somewhere around the average size 16 or 18. The brand places a great deal of importance on authenticity and deflecting the male gaze, yet disappointingly does not push itself to create inclusive pieces beyond the acceptable “small fat” or “curvy” sizing. Furthermore, there is a dearth of dark-skinned representation within the campaign.

Related: 3 Lingerie Companies That Are Changing The Industry for Plus-Size Babes

It feels as though Lonely is co-opting the plus-size and body-positivity movements without committing to real representation. It doesn’t push beyond the forms of fat currently embraced (and standards of beauty currently enforced) — or beyond the most Eurocentrically acceptable level of melanin. The campaign winds up holding itself to the same standards of the gaze it claims to subvert.

“Inspired by the women who wear it, each Lonely collection is part of an ongoing conversation that maintains a consistent design ethos committed to outstanding comfort, unique signature silhouettes and custom prints and fabrications.

Fostering a sense of positive body image and freedom of expression, Lonely eschews conventional marketing, bringing its collections to life via the Lonely Girls Project, a journal featuring women around the world from all walks of life captured wearing Lonely in their way.”

Instead of the media pushing more images of Lena Dunham and Jemima Kirke, let’s shift our focus to celebrate the other beautiful, untouched women featured within the campaign. Dunham slumped over in her underwear may not be a revelation, but some of these images feel like the beginning of one.

Isa, soul singer from NYC. Shot by Zara for #LonelyGirlsProject ❤️

A photo posted by Lonely Lingerie (@lonelylingerie) on

Paloma & Cyd ❣ Poppy scalloped lace & a relaxed halter silhouette come together for our Cyd longline. #LonelyLingerie

A photo posted by Lonely Lingerie (@lonelylingerie) on

Sly in her Agnes set ♡ We love seeing your photos, thank you for sharing x

A photo posted by Lonely Lingerie (@lonelylingerie) on

Betty meet Agnes. Mix & matching two of our favourites, the Betty bra & Agnes high waisted brief. #LonelyLingerie

A photo posted by Lonely Lingerie (@lonelylingerie) on

Fine arts student Anna spending Sundays at home in her Lux ♡ Shot by Harry in Auckland, NZ for #lonelygirlsproject

A photo posted by Lonely Lingerie (@lonelylingerie) on

Chrissie & bump in the Harper Underwire & Brief for #LonelyGirlsProject 💕 @chrissiemiller @zaraeloise

A photo posted by Lonely Lingerie (@lonelylingerie) on

Outtake of Derya in her Redwood Cyd set for @lonelygirlsproject 🍂

A photo posted by Lonely Lingerie (@lonelylingerie) on

The Lonely Girls project seems to fall just short of its mission. While the campaign is not perfect, it is aimed in the right direction. Still, it falls drastically short in terms of dark-skinned representation or showing a truly progressive, inclusive attitude toward bigger bodies.

Perhaps the folks at Lonely will hear the call to be more inclusive. But, Lonely, one more thing: while you’re at it, lose Dunham. 

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