Yesterday was National Topless Day, an event created by by GoTopless in support of gender equality and Women’s Equality Day happening August 26.

From NBC News to The Australian, publications from around the globe covered the annual event, where ‘people in cities around the world were invited to stand up for women’s right to go topless in public,’ according to gotopless.org.

While we couldn’t be happier that women are banding together for gender equality, we can’t help but think how much more powerful campaigns like these would be if they were inclusive of all women?

As images came pouring in on social media, the lack of diverse bodies in the demonstrations were apparent. And while this doesn’t imply that there weren’t Black, Trans, Latina and Asian POC attending the demonstrations, it does suggest that POC were outnumbered by white cis-gendered women in another feminist movement, yet again.

Take for example, the Daily Mail’s coverage of the event. Of the 60 women in the photographs, only 7 women pictured were obviously POC. ( I use the word obviously as I cannot suggest that some of the 60 women were in fact POC, however, only 7 women photographed I can say with surety are POC).  Similar was the case of images I found in other publications, where POC represented a minority of those photographed.

https://instagram.com/p/6N5p7cFYvd/?taken-by=freethenipple 

Of course the organizers can’t determine, nor are responsible for who does and doesn’t show up to an event when they have an open invitation for all bodies,  but maybe if campaigns like #freethenipple showed more diversity in their campaigns, people from various backgrounds would be more compelled to attend such events in the first place.

In an article published on Dazed in March, writer Zing Tsjeng noted the lack of diversity in #freethenipple’s campaign:

Scrolling through the #freethenipple hashtag, you notice a few things: a lot of the posters are white, thin and able-bodied. Many are conventionally attractive; most of them are young. In short: no old, flabby, lopsided or wrinkly tits here. For a campaign that claims to work against sexual objectification and censorship – something that arguably affects all women at some point in their lives – that lack of diversity is an honest shame.

All women deserve to be liberated–that includes trans* women, Latina women, Black women, Asian women–ALL women. And while campaigns like #freethenipple proclaim this a a movement for all women, their use of imagery suggests otherwise.

At Wear Your Voice, we decided to take things into our own hands, with our own campaign #liberateALLnipples. In part, #liberateALLnipples was inspired by the people who bravely took to San Francisco’s Financial District topless in May to raise awareness of the Black women dying in police custody. #SayHerName launched an international dialogue on the state of Black women in America, who are often left out of national movements, such as #freethenipple. ( We were honored to have one of the women who participated in the #SayHerName protest in S.F participate in the photo series below.)

http://twitter.com/blackoutcollect/status/601416606166593537/photo/1

#freethenipple proclaims to end the objectification of women and rape culture, but if we consider  that black women are at greater risk of being sexually assaulted than their white counterparts, why are the women who are most vulnerable eliminated from such a potentially powerful campaign?

While these images focus primarily on Black POC, we invite ALL bodies to participate in #liberateALLnipples. In the same token of our body positive summer campaign #DropTheTowel, this is a movement for all body shapes, sizes, colors, and genders who want to take a stand towards gender equality.

Help us grow this movement and bring diversity to #freethenipple– share our story, and help us #liberateALLnipples.

Photoshoot created and directed by Monica Lynn.  Photogaraphy by Suma Jane Dark for Wear Your Voice Magazine

#liberateALLnipples

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